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Dewar-to-dewar data transfer at GHz rates

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7 Author(s)
Przybysz, J.X. ; Northrop Grumman STC, Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; McCambridge, J.D. ; Dresselhaus, P.D. ; Worsham, A.H.
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Digital circuits have been developed to interface superconductive electronic chips with high speed 50-/spl Omega/ transmission lines. Digital data at 1 Gigabit per second was transferred through a Josephson chip in a first cryostat to another Josephson chip in a second cryostat. The chips were connected by more than 3 meters of 50-/spl Omega/ transmission line. No semiconductor amplifiers were used in this data path. A Hewlett Packard data source provided the original data to the first chip, which converted it to SFQ data. Output interface circuits were driven by a 2-GHz external clock to latch series strings of 10 junctions and drive 2-Gbps data into a 50-/spl Omega/ cable. In the second cryostat, a latching three-junction interferometer with a two-turn control line converted the input signal to latched data and switched an MVTL OR-gate output. This demonstration showed that low-power Josephson digital circuits can be integrated into multichip digital subsystems that can pass data at high rates without the use of power-hungry semiconductor amplifiers.

Published in:

Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:9 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

June 1999

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