Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

The integration of science explorations through the use of Earth images in middle school curriculum

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

3 Author(s)
Stork, E.J. ; Inst. for Educ. Adv., Pasadena, CA, USA ; Sakamoto, S.O. ; Cowan, R.M.

KidSat was a pilot project dedicated to bringing students to the center of the learning process. In this unique pilot program. KidSat created a dynamic collaboration among middle school, high school, and university students with scientists, engineers, teachers, and educational theorists to create a program that tied “real-time” science exploration and discovery to learning in the classroom. This project, supported by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), Johnson Space Center (JSC), and corporate and individual donors, inspired and motivated young people to expand their knowledge base through the use of Earth images. Middle school students from across the country controlled a student-designed, digital camera mounted onboard three space shuttle missions. Images from this instrument were incorporated into the teaching process and demonstrated the importance of using real data to excite and motivate young people. By providing students the opportunity to learn through analysis of self-chosen images of the Earth taken from the space shuttle, the acquisition of knowledge became more relevant and applicable to all subject areas. This initiative changed the expectations of many participants as to what students can learn and accomplish when provided with exciting content, well-trained teachers, and access to real data

Published in:

Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:37 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

Jul 1999

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.