Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Adaptive frequency-domain equalization and diversity combining for broadband wireless communications

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Clark, M.V. ; AT&T Labs.-Res., Red Bank, NJ, USA

We introduce a new kind of adaptive equalizer that operates in the spatial-frequency domain and uses either least mean square (LMS) or recursive least squares (RLS) adaptive processing. We simulate the equalizer's performance in an 8-Mb/s quaternary phase-shift keying (QPSK) link over a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading multipath channel with ~3 μs RMS delay spread, corresponding to 60 symbols of dispersion. With the RLS algorithm and two diversity branches, our results show rapid convergence and channel tracking for a range of mobile speeds (up to ~100 mi/h). With a mobile speed of 40 mi/h, for example, the equalizer achieves an average bit error rate (BER) of 10 -4 at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15 dB, falling short of optimum linear receiver performance by about 4 dB. Moreover, it requires only ~50 complex operations per detected bit, i.e., ~400 M operations per second, which is close to achievable with state-of-the-art digital signal processing technology. An equivalent time-domain equalizer, if it converged at all, would require orders-of-magnitude more processing

Published in:

Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on  (Volume:16 ,  Issue: 8 )

Date of Publication:

Oct 1998

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.