Scheduled System Maintenance:
On Wednesday, July 29th, IEEE Xplore will undergo scheduled maintenance from 7:00-9:00 AM ET (11:00-13:00 UTC). During this time there may be intermittent impact on performance. We apologize for any inconvenience.
By Topic

Microfluidic MEMS for semiconductor processing

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

12 Author(s)
Henning, Albert K. ; Redwood Microsystems, Inc., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA ; Fitch, John S. ; Harris, James M. ; Dehan, Edward B.
more authors

The advent of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) will enable dramatic changes in semiconductor processing. MEMS-based devices offer opportunities to achieve higher performance and functionality, at lower cost, with decreased size and increased reliability. In this work, we describe the achievement of several important devices for use in the semiconductor equipment industry. They include a low-flow mass flow controller, a high-precision pressure regulator, and an integrated gas panel. Compared to current technology, the devices are ultra-small in size, thus minimizing dead volumes and gas contact surface areas. With wettable surfaces comprised of ceramic and silicon (or, silicon coated with Si3N4 or SiC), they are resistant to corrosion, and generate virtually no particles. The devices are created from modular components. The science and technology of these components will be detailed. The modules examined are: normally-open proportional valves; normally-closed, low leak-rate shut-off valves; critical orifices (to extract information of flow rate); flow models (to extract flow rate from pressure and temperature information); silicon-based pressure sensors; and, the precision ceramic-based packages which integrate these modules into useful devices for semiconductor processing. The work finishes with a detailed description of the low-flow mass flow controller.

Published in:

Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology, Part B: Advanced Packaging, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:21 ,  Issue: 4 )