Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Detection and Reconstruction of An Implicit Boundary Surface by Adaptively Expanding A Small Surface Patch in A 3D Image

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

7 Author(s)
Wang, L. ; Lisheng Wang is with Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and with Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200240, P. R. China.(email:lswang@sjtu.edu.cn) ; Wang, P. ; Cheng, L. ; Ma, Y.
more authors

In this paper we propose a novel and easy to use 3D reconstruction method. With the method, users only need to specify a small boundary surface patch in a 2D section image, and then an entire continuous implicit boundary surface (CIBS) can be automatically reconstructed from a 3D image. In the method, a hierarchical tracing strategy is used to grow the known boundary surface patch gradually in the 3D image. An adaptive detection technique is applied to detect boundary surface patches from different local regions. The technique is based on both context dependence and adaptive contrast detection as in the human vision system. A recognition technique is used to distinguish true boundary surface patches from the false ones in different cubes. By integrating these different approaches, a high-resolution CIBS model can be automatically reconstructed by adaptively expanding the small boundary surface patch in the 3D image. The effectiveness of our method is demonstrated by its applications to a variety of real 3D images, where the CIBS with complex shapes/branches and with varying gray values/gradient magnitudes can be well reconstructed. Our method is easy to use, which provides a valuable tool for 3D image visualization and analysis as needed in many applications.

Published in:

Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:PP ,  Issue: 99 )

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.