Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Vector volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

9 Author(s)
Hansen, P.M. ; Univ. Hosp. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark ; Heerwagen, S. ; Pedersen, M.M. ; Rix, M.
more authors

The majority of patients with end stage renal disease are in hemodialysis, and therefore dependent on a well functioning vascular access. The arteriovenous fistula is the recommended access and in order to maintain and keep the fistula patent, regular monitoring of the function is necessary. The Ultrasound Dilution Technique is the reference method for volume flow measurement, but it only works in conjunction with the dialysis machine, and use is therefore restricted to dialysis sessions. Volume flow measurement with conventional Doppler ultrasound provides a non invasive, highly accessible solution, but is very challenging due to the angle dependency of the Doppler technique and the anatomy of the fistula. The angle independent vector ultrasound technique Transverse Oscillation provides a new and more intuitive way to measure volume flow in an arteriovenous fistula. In this paper the Transverse Oscillation has been used to measure volume flow directly on four patients' arteriovenous fistulas, and the measurements were compared to subsequent measurements with the Ultrasound Dilution Technique. The results obtained with the Transverse Oscillation deviate -35.1 - 14.9 % from the reference method, and indicates potential for the method.

Published in:

Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2013 IEEE International

Date of Conference:

21-25 July 2013

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.