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Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices

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7 Author(s)
Nevan C. Hanumara ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA ; Nikolai D. Begg ; Conor J. Walsh ; David Custer
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Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer-reviewed publications, stimulated further research, furthered student and clinician careers, and resulted in technology licenses and start-up ventures.

Methods and outcomes from MIT's nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies while teaching mechanical engineering. Methods and outcomes from MIT's nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies while teaching mechanical engineering.

Published in:

IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine  (Volume:1 )