Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

General Subspace Learning With Corrupted Training Data Via Graph Embedding

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

5 Author(s)
Bing-Kun Bao ; Nat. Lab. of Pattern Recognition, Inst. of Autom., Beijing, China ; Guangcan Liu ; Richang Hong ; Shuicheng Yan
more authors

We address the following subspace learning problem: supposing we are given a set of labeled, corrupted training data points, how to learn the underlying subspace, which contains three components: an intrinsic subspace that captures certain desired properties of a data set, a penalty subspace that fits the undesired properties of the data, and an error container that models the gross corruptions possibly existing in the data. Given a set of data points, these three components can be learned by solving a nuclear norm regularized optimization problem, which is convex and can be efficiently solved in polynomial time. Using the method as a tool, we propose a new discriminant analysis (i.e., supervised subspace learning) algorithm called Corruptions Tolerant Discriminant Analysis (CTDA), in which the intrinsic subspace is used to capture the features with high within-class similarity, the penalty subspace takes the role of modeling the undesired features with high between-class similarity, and the error container takes charge of fitting the possible corruptions in the data. We show that CTDA can well handle the gross corruptions possibly existing in the training data, whereas previous linear discriminant analysis algorithms arguably fail in such a setting. Extensive experiments conducted on two benchmark human face data sets and one object recognition data set show that CTDA outperforms the related algorithms.

Published in:

Image Processing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:22 ,  Issue: 11 )

Date of Publication:

Nov. 2013

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.