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Identifying User Experience Dimensions for Mobile Incident Reporting in Urban Contexts

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3 Author(s)
Winckler, M. ; ICS-IRIT, Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France ; Bach, C. ; Bernhaupt, R.

Research problem: Despite the increasing interests raised by incident reporting systems, it is still unclear what dimensions of user experience (UX) and other contextual factors should be taken into account for the various stages of declaring an incident using mobile-phone applications. Research questions: How do citizens perceive and describe urban incidents? What UX dimensions are important for reporting an incident with a mobile-phone application? What other (contextual) factors are important from the users' point of view when declaring incidents? Which of the UX dimensions and contextual factors are important when in the various phases during an incident declaration? Literature review: Overall, there is a lack of empirical research in the domain of incident reporting. In general, the UX dimensions-visual and aesthetic experience, emotion, stimulation, identification, meaning and value, and social relatedness/coexperience-are important when designing interactive systems. It also shows that incidents are related to the citizen's perception of the environment. Methodology: A triangulated method approach combining interviews, a survey of existing systems, and a model-based task analysis were applied. This allows us to present a generic task model for incident reporting with a detailed description of UX dimensions affected in the various subtasks. Results and conclusions: Our findings point out the effect of UX dimensions in the task engaged by users when reporting urban citizens. The overall UX is directly influenced by the perceived level of severity, inconvenience and involvement, the personal context, and the technological mobile context. We have found that while several UX dimensions are highly relevant, they are not equally distributed along the several subtasks that citizens engage when reporting incidents. This study shows that semistructured requirement interviews can provide information about UX dimensions and it highlights the importance of the identifi- ation of UX dimensions in early phases of the development process.

Published in:

Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:56 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

June 2013

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