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Slip-Turn for Biped Robots

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5 Author(s)
Miura, K. ; Intell. Syst. Res. Inst., Nat. Inst. of Adv. Ind. Sci. & Technol., Tsukuba, Japan ; Kanehiro, F. ; Kaneko, K. ; Kajita, S.
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This paper presents a method for generating a turning motion in a humanoid robot by allowing the feet of the robot to slip on the ground. As humans, we exploit the fact that our feet can slip on the ground, and allowing humanoid robots to realize this same motion is a worthwhile study. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that a turning motion is caused by the effect of minimizing the power generated by floor friction. A model of rotation from this friction is then described based on our hypothesis. The proposed model suggests that only the trajectory and shape of the robot's feet determine the amount of rotation from a slip, and that the friction coefficient between the floor and the soles of the robot, as well as the velocity of the feet, do not affect the resultant angle. Verification is conducted through an experiment with a humanoid robot known as HRP-2. Next, to obtain the foot motion necessary to realize the desired rotational angle, the inverse problem is solved by confining the trajectory of the center of the foot to an arc shape. This solution is verified through an experiment with another humanoid robot, HRP-4C.

Published in:

Robotics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:29 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

Aug. 2013

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