By Topic

Injecting the Architectural Resiliency into Distributed Autonomic Systems Using DIME Network Architecture

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)
Mikkilineni, Rao ; KawaObjects Inc., Los Altos, CA, USA ; Morana, G.

By introducing signaling and self-management in a Turing node and a signaling network as an overlay over the computing network, the current von-Neumann computing model is evolved to bring the architectural resiliency of cellular organisms to computing infrastructure. The DIME computing model introduces the genetic transactions of replication, repair, recombination and reconfiguration to program self-resiliency in distributed computing systems executing a managed workflow. The injection of parallelism and network based composition of "Self" identity are the first steps in introducing the elements of homeostasis and self-management in the computing infrastructure. DIMEs inject the architectural resiliency of cellular organisms to create a new class of distributed autonomic computing systems using managed Turing machine networks.

Published in:

Complex, Intelligent and Software Intensive Systems (CISIS), 2012 Sixth International Conference on

Date of Conference:

4-6 July 2012