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Glove-talk II - a neural-network interface which maps gestures to parallel formant speech synthesizer controls

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2 Author(s)
Fels, S.S. ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., Toronto Univ., Ont., Canada ; Hinton, G.E.

Glove-Talk II is a system which translates hand gestures to speech through an adaptive interface. Hand gestures are mapped continuously to ten control parameters of a parallel formant speech synthesizer. The mapping allows the hand to act as an artificial vocal tract that produces speech in real time. This gives an unlimited vocabulary in addition to direct control of fundamental frequency and volume. Currently, the best version of Glove-Talk II uses several input devices, a parallel formant speech synthesizer, and three neural networks. The gesture-to-speech task is divided into vowel and consonant production by using a gating network to weight the outputs of a vowel and a consonant neural network. The gating network and the consonant network are trained with examples from the user. The vowel network implements a fixed user-defined relationship between hand position and vowel sound and does not require any training examples from the user. Volume, fundamental frequency, and stop consonants are produced with a fixed mapping from the input devices. With Glove-Talk II, the subject can speak slowly but with far more natural sounding pitch variations than a text-to-speech synthesizer

Published in:

Neural Networks, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:8 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 1997

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