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Somatosensory evoked potentials elicited by stimulating two fingers from one hand — Usable for BCI?

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4 Author(s)
Breitwieser, C. ; BCI Lab., Graz Univ. of Technol., Graz, Austria ; Pokorny, C. ; Neuper, C. ; Muller-Putz, G.R.

Steady-state somatosensory evoked potentials (SSSEPs) have been elicited using vibro-tactile stimulation on two fingers of the right hand. Fourteen healthy subjects participated in this study. A screening session, stimulating each participant's thumb, was conducted to determine individual optimal resonance-like frequencies. After this screening session, two stimulation frequencies per subject were selected. Stimulation was then applied simultaneously on the participant's thumbs and middle finger. It was investigated whether it is possible to classify SSSEP changes based on an attention modulation task to determine possible BCI applications. A cue indicated the participants to shift their attention to either the thumb or the middle finger. Offline classification with a lock-in analyzer system (LAS) and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier was performed. One bipolar channel and no further optimization methods were used. All participants except one reached classification results above chance level classifying a reference period without focused attention against focused attention either to the thumb or the middle finger. Only two subjects reached accuracies above chance, classifying focused attention to the thumb vs. attention to the middle finger.

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society,EMBC, 2011 Annual International Conference of the IEEE

Date of Conference:

Aug. 30 2011-Sept. 3 2011

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