Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

An analog VLSI architecture for auditory based feature extraction

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

4 Author(s)
Kumar, N. ; Center for Language & Speech Process., Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD, USA ; Himmelbauer, W. ; Cauwenberghs, G. ; Andreou, A.G.

We have developed a low power analog VLSI chip for real time signal processing motivated by the principles of the human auditory system. An analog cochlear filter bank (which is implemented on the chip) decomposes the input audio signal into several frequency bands that have almost equal bandwidth on a log scale. This step is thus similar to computing the wavelet transform. The chip then computes signal energies and zero crossing time intervals of frequency components in a cochlear filter bank. The chip is intended to work as a front-end of a speech recognition system. We include experimental results on a VLSI implementation of the auditory front-end. We present speech recognition results on the TI-DIGITS database obtained from computer simulations which model the functionality of the feature extraction VLSI hardware. We use hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for the recognizer design

Published in:

Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 1997. ICASSP-97., 1997 IEEE International Conference on  (Volume:5 )

Date of Conference:

21-24 Apr 1997

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.