By Topic

Bibliometric discovery of innovation and commercialization pathways in nanotechnology

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)
Cunningham, S.W. ; Fac. of Technol., Policy & Manage., Delft Univ. of Technol., Delft, Netherlands ; Porter, A.L.

Nanotechnology is widely seen as the source of the next industrial revolution. As a result, national governments have made short-term stimulus investments in nanoscience in the hopes of achieving long-lasting economic and societal benefits. Despite the stimulus funding, the scale and timing of new nanotechnology innovations are far from clear. Part of the problem stems from the fact that nanoscience is often far upstream of potential societal application. But the issue is more complex given the evidently complex coupling of science, technology and commercialization. Nanotechnology itself is often presented as an exemplar of a new class of strategic research initiatives. In this paper we characterize nanotechnology commercialization in a well-recognized database of nanotechnology research. Contributions are made to the ongoing effort to define, and refine, the relevant knowledge base for nano-science and technology. The effort further requires novel techniques for isolating commercially-relevant research in large databases of science.

Published in:

Technology Management in the Energy Smart World (PICMET), 2011 Proceedings of PICMET '11:

Date of Conference:

July 31 2011-Aug. 4 2011