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Security Embedding Codes

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3 Author(s)
Ly, H.D. ; Dept. of Electr. & Comput. Eng., Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX, USA ; Tie Liu ; Blankenship, Y.

This paper considers the problem of simultaneously communicating two messages, a high-security message and a low-security message, to a legitimate receiver, referred to as the security embedding problem. An information-theoretic formulation of the problem is presented. A coding scheme that combines rate splitting, superposition coding, nested binning, and channel prefixing is considered and is shown to achieve the secrecy capacity region of the channel in several scenarios. Specifying these results to both scalar and independent parallel Gaussian channels (under an average individual per-subchannel power constraint), it is shown that the high-security message can be embedded into the low-security message at full rate (as if the low-security message does not exist) without incurring any loss on the overall rate of communication (as if both messages are low-security messages). Extensions to the wiretap channel II setting of Ozarow and Wyner are also considered, where it is shown that "perfect" security embedding can be achieved by an encoder that uses a two-level coset code.

Published in:

Information Forensics and Security, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:7 ,  Issue: 1 )

Date of Publication:

Feb. 2012

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