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Modified Solenoid Coil That Efficiently Produces High Amplitude AC Magnetic Fields With Enhanced Uniformity for Biomedical Applications

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7 Author(s)
Bordelon, D.E. ; Sch. of Med., Dept. of Radiat. Oncology & Mol. Radiat. Sci., Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD, USA ; Goldstein, R.C. ; Nemkov, V.S. ; Kumar, A.
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In this paper, we describe a modified solenoid coil that efficiently generates high amplitude alternating magnetic fields (AMF) having field uniformity (≤10%) within a 125-cm3 volume of interest. Two-dimensional finite element analysis (2D-FEA) was used to design a coil generating a targeted peak AMF amplitude along the coil axis of ~ 100 kA/m (peak-to-peak) at a frequency of 150 kHz while maintaining field uniformity to >; 90% of peak for a specified volume. This field uniformity was realized by forming the turns from cylindrical sections of copper plate and by adding flux concentrating rings to both ends of the coil. Following construction, the field profile along the axes of the coil was measured. An axial peak field value of 95.8 ± 0.4 kA/m was measured with 650 V applied to the coil and was consistent with the calculated results. The region of axial field uniformity, defined as the distance over which field ≥ 90% of peak, was also consistent with the simulated results. We describe the utility of such a device for calorimetric measurement of nanoparticle heating for cancer therapy and for magnetic fluid hyperthermia in small animal models of human cancer.

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Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:48 ,  Issue: 1 )