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High-Frequency and Low-Frequency Chest Compression: Effects on Lung Water Secretion, Mucus Transport, Heart Rate, and Blood Pressure Using a Trapezoidal Source Pressure Waveform

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4 Author(s)
O'Clock, G.D. ; Med. Sch., Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA ; Yong Wan Lee ; Jongwong Lee ; Warwick, W.J.

High-frequency chest compression (HFCC), using an appropriate source (pump) waveform for frequencies at or above 3 Hz, can enhance pulmonary clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using a trapezoidal HFCC source pressure waveform, secretion of water from epithelial tissue and transport of mucus through lung airways can be enhanced for patients with CF and COPD. At frequencies below 3 Hz, low-frequency chest compression (LFCC) appears to have a significant impact on the cardiovascular system. For a trapezoidal source pressure waveform at frequencies close to 1 Hz, LFCC produces amplitude or intensity variations in various components of the electrocardiogram time-domain waveform, produces changes at very low frequencies associated with the electrocardiogram frequency spectra (indicating enhanced parasympathetic nervous system activity), and promotes a form of heart rate synchronization. It appears that LFCC can also provide additional cardiovascular benefits by reducing peak and average systolic and diastolic blood pressure for patients with hypertension.

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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:59 ,  Issue: 1 )