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Delegation-Based I/O Mechanism for High Performance Computing Systems

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3 Author(s)
Nisar, A. ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., Univ. of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA ; Wei-keng Liao ; Choudhary, A.

Massively parallel applications often require periodic data checkpointing for program restart and post-run data analysis. Although high performance computing systems provide massive parallelism and computing power to fulfill the crucial requirements of the scientific applications, the I/O tasks of high-end applications do not scale. Strict data consistency semantics adopted from traditional file systems are inadequate for homogeneous parallel computing platforms. For high performance parallel applications independent I/O is critical, particularly if checkpointing data are dynamically created or irregularly partitioned. In particular, parallel programs generating a large number of unrelated I/O accesses on large-scale systems often face serious I/O serializations introduced by lock contention and conflicts at file system layer. As these applications may not be able to utilize the I/O optimizations requiring process synchronization, they pose a great challenge for parallel I/O architecture and software designs. We propose an I/O mechanism to bridge the gap between scientific applications and parallel storage systems. A static file domain partitioning method is developed to align the I/O requests and produce a client-server mapping that minimizes the file lock acquisition costs and eliminates the lock contention. Our performance evaluations of production application I/O kernels demonstrate scalable performance and achieve high I/O bandwidths.

Published in:

Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:23 ,  Issue: 2 )