Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Designing a Thalamic Somatosensory Neural Prosthesis: Consistency and Persistence of Percepts Evoked by Electrical Stimulation

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

4 Author(s)
Heming, E.A. ; Dept. of Clinical Neurosci., Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada ; Choo, R. ; Davies, J.N. ; Kiss, Z.H.T.

Intuitive somatosensory feedback is required for fine motor control. Here we explored whether thalamic electrical stimulation could provide the necessary durations and consistency of percepts for a human somatosensory neural prosthetic. Continuous and cycling high-frequency (185 Hz, 0.21 ms pulse duration charge balanced square wave) electrical pulses with the cycling patterns varying between 7% and 67% of duty cycle were applied in five patients with chronically implanted deep brain stimulators. Stimulation produced similar percepts to those elicited immediately after surgery. While consecutive continuous stimuli produced decreasing durations of sensation, the amplitude and type of percept did not change. Cycling stimulation with shorter duty cycles produced more persisting percepts. These features suggest that the thalamus could provide a site for stable and enduring sensations necessary for a long term somatosensory neural prosthesis.

Published in:

Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:19 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Oct. 2011

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.