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Analytical electron microscopy investigation of elemental composition and bonding structure at the Sb-doped Ni-fully-silicide/SiO2 interface

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6 Author(s)
Kawasaki, Naohiko ; Morphological Research Laboratory, Toray Research Center Inc., Otsu, Shiga, Japan ; Sugiyama, Naoyuki ; Otsuka, Yuji ; Hashimoto, Hideki
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It is very important to control the elemental composition and bonding structure at the gate electrode/ gate dielectrics interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor devices because this determines the threshold voltage of the gate electrode. In this study, we investigated the structure at the interface between the antimony (Sb)-doped nickel-fully-silicide gate electrode and SiO2 dielectrics by employing high-spatial resolution techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope. In one region, we found a thin nickel layer at the NiSi/SiO2 interface originating from the migration of native oxide at the face of the poly-silicon. In another region, a Sb pileup was detected at the NiSi/SiO2 interface where the Ni L3-edge spectrum showed Ni–Sb bonding, then it was suggested that Sb atoms exist at the bottom of NiSi, substituting for Si atoms in NiSi.

Published in:

Journal of Applied Physics  (Volume:109 ,  Issue: 6 )

Date of Publication:

Mar 2011

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