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A high-power versatile wireless power transfer for biomedical implants

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7 Author(s)
Hao Jiang ; Sch. of Eng., San Francisco State Univ., San Francisco, CA, USA ; Jun Min Zhang ; Shy Shenq Liou ; Fechter, R.
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Implantable biomedical actuators are highly desired in modern medicine. However, how to power up these biomedical implants remains a challenge since most of them need more than several hundreds mW of power. The air-core based radio-frequency transformer (two face-to-face inductive coils) has been the only non-toxic and non-invasive power source for implants for the last three decades [1]. For various technical constraints, the maximum delivered power is limited by this approach. The highest delivered power reported is 275 mW over 1 cm distance [2]. Also, the delivered power is highly vulnerable to the coils' geometrical arrangement and the electrical property of the medium around them. In this paper, a novel rotating-magnets based wireless power transfer that can deliver ~10 W over 1 cm is demonstrated. The delivered power is significantly higher than the existing start-of-art. Further, the new method is versatile since there is no need to have the impedance matching networks that are highly susceptible to the operating frequency, the coil arrangement and the environment.

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International Conference of the IEEE

Date of Conference:

Aug. 31 2010-Sept. 4 2010

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