Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Functional connectivity networks in the autistic and healthy brain assessed using Granger causality

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

6 Author(s)
Pollonini, L. ; Dept. of Eng. Technol., Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX, USA ; Patidar, U. ; Ning Situ ; Rezaie, R.
more authors

In this study, we analyze brain connectivity based on Granger causality computed from magnetoencephalographic (MEG) activity obtained at the resting state in eight autistic and eight normal subjects along with measures of network connectivity derived from graph theory in an attempt to understand how communication in a human brain network is affected by autism. A connectivity matrix was computed for each subject individually and then group templates were estimated by averaging all matrices in each group. Furthermore, we performed classification of the subjects using support vector machines and Fisher's criterion to rank the features and identify the best subset for maximum separation of the groups. Our results show that a combined model based on connectivity matrices and graph theory measures can provide 87.5% accuracy in separating the two groups. These findings suggest that analysis of functional connectivity patterns may provide a valuable method for the early detection of autism.

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International Conference of the IEEE

Date of Conference:

Aug. 31 2010-Sept. 4 2010

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.