By Topic

Effect of Posture Change on the Geometric Features of the Healthy Carotid Bifurcation

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

7 Author(s)
Aristokleous, N. ; Cyprus Univ. of Technol., Limassol, Cyprus ; Seimenis, I. ; Papaharilaou, Y. ; Georgiou, G.C.
more authors

Segmented cross-sectional MRI images were used to construct 3-D virtual models of the carotid bifurcation in ten healthy volunteers. Geometric features, such as bifurcation angle, internal carotid artery (ICA) angle, planarity angle, asymmetry angle, tortuosity, curvature, bifurcation area ratio, ICA/common carotid artery (CCA), external carotid artery (ECA)/CCA, and ECA/ICA diameter ratios, were calculated for both carotids in two head postures: 1) the supine neutral position; and 2) the prone sleeping position with head rotation to the right (~80°). The results obtained have shown that head rotation causes 1) significant variations in bifurcation angle [32% mean increase for the right carotid (RC) and 21% mean decrease for the left carotid (LC)] and internal carotid artery angle (97% mean increase for the RC, 43% mean decrease for the LC); 2) a slight increase in planarity and asymmetry angles for both RC and LC; 3) minor and variable curvature changes for the CCA and for the branches; 4) slight tortuosity changes for the braches but not for the CCA; and 5) unsubstantial alterations in area and diameter ratios (percentage changes <;10%). The significant geometric changes observed in most subjects with head posture may also cause significant changes in bifurcation hemodynamics and warrant future investigation of the hemodynamic parameters related to the development of atherosclerotic disease such as low oscillating wall shear stress and particle residence times.

Published in:

Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:15 ,  Issue: 1 )