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Denial of Service Attacks in Wireless Networks: The Case of Jammers

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3 Author(s)
Pelechrinis, K. ; Univ. of California, Riverside, CA, USA ; Iliofotou, M. ; Krishnamurthy, S.V.

The shared nature of the medium in wireless networks makes it easy for an adversary to launch a Wireless Denial of Service (WDoS) attack. Recent studies, demonstrate that such attacks can be very easily accomplished using off-the-shelf equipment. To give a simple example, a malicious node can continually transmit a radio signal in order to block any legitimate access to the medium and/or interfere with reception. This act is called jamming and the malicious nodes are referred to as jammers. Jamming techniques vary from simple ones based on the continual transmission of interference signals, to more sophisticated attacks that aim at exploiting vulnerabilities of the particular protocol used. In this survey, we present a detailed up-to-date discussion on the jamming attacks recorded in the literature. We also describe various techniques proposed for detecting the presence of jammers. Finally, we survey numerous mechanisms which attempt to protect the network from jamming attacks. We conclude with a summary and by suggesting future directions.

Published in:

Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE  (Volume:13 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

Second Quarter 2011

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