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Free‐standing thin film Ge single crystals grown by plasma‐enhanced chemical vapor deposition

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2 Author(s)
Outlaw, R.A. ; NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23665 ; Hopson, P., Jr.

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1063/1.333401 

Single crystal Ge films (∼10 μm) have been epitaxially grown on polished (100) NaCl substrates at 450 °C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Upon cooling, the films were separated from the substrate by differential shear stress which left handleable free‐standing films of Ge. Growths were achieved by nucleating at minimum plasma power (∼10 W) for very short intervals and then raising the power to 65 W to increase the growth rate to approximately 10 μm/h. Substrate exposure to the plasma at too high a power for too long a time was found to sputter and erode the surface, thus substantially degrading the nucleation process and the ultimate growths. The free‐standing films were visually specular and exhibited a high degree of crystalline order when examined by x‐ray diffraction. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and energy dispersive analysis of x rays (EDAX) showed no detectable bulk contamination. The films were found to be p type with a carrier concentration of approximately 3×1016 cm-3, a resistivity of 0.11 Ω cm, and a Hall hole mobility of 1820 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature.

Published in:

Journal of Applied Physics  (Volume:55 ,  Issue: 6 )

Date of Publication:

Mar 1984

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