By Topic

Effect of gases on the field emission properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond-coated silicon field emitter arrays

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $31
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

6 Author(s)
Hajra, M. ; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 ; Hunt, C.E. ; Ding, M. ; Auciello, O.
more authors

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1063/1.1594268 

We performed studies of electron emission from ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)-coated, ungated silicon field emitters as a function of in situ exposure to various gases during current versus voltage and current versus time measurements. The emitter arrays were fabricated by a subtractive tip fabrication process and coated with UNCD films using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition with a CH4/Ar plasma chemistry. The emission characteristics of the coated tip arrays were studied in the diode configuration; using a 2 mm diameter anode with rounded edges to suppress arcing. Significant enhancement of the electron emission was observed, increasing from 35% to 100%, after the emitting surface was exposed to H2 at pressures in the 10-5 and 10-4Torr range. Upon termination of the H2 exposure, the current decreased to the initial value of 2 μA. The emission current subsequently remained stable at 2 μA upon continued evacuation down to the base pressure below 10-9Torr. The emission current variation is repeatable with ensuing hydrogen exposure, indicating that the enhancement is due to the hydrogen exposure. Negligible emission current variations are observed at pressures less than 10-5Torr. Exposure to either Ar or N2 resulted in a reduction of the emission current for ambients of up to 10-5Torr. This effect is reversible. The effect of the investigated gases on the emission characteristics of UNCD-coated Si tip arrays is attributed to a modification of the effective work function at the localized sites from where elec- trons are being emitted. © 2003 American Institute of Physics.

Published in:

Journal of Applied Physics  (Volume:94 ,  Issue: 6 )