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A Technique to Measure Eyelid Pressure Using Piezoresistive Sensors

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4 Author(s)
Alyra J. Shaw* ; Contact Lens & Visual Opt. Lab., Queensland Univ. of Technol. (QUT), Brisbane, QLD, Australia ; Brett A. Davis ; Michael J. Collins ; Leo G. Carney

In this paper, novel procedures were developed using a thin (0.17 mm) tactile piezoresistive pressure sensor mounted on a rigid contact lens to measure upper eyelid pressure. A hydrostatic calibration system was constructed, and the influence of conditioning (prestressing), drift (continued increasing response with a static load), and temperature variations on the response of the sensor were examined. To optimally position the sensor-contact lens combination under the upper eyelid margin, an in vivo measurement apparatus was constructed. Calibration gave a linear relationship between raw sensor output and actual pressure units for loads between 1 and 10 mmHg (R 2 = 0.96 ). Conditioning the sensor prior to use regulated the measurement response, and sensor output stabilized about 10 s after loading. While sensor output drifts slightly over several hours, it was not significant beyond the measurement time of 1 min used for eyelid pressure. The error associated with calibrating at room temperature but measuring at ocular surface temperature led to a very small overestimation of pressure. Eyelid pressure readings were observed when the upper eyelid was placed on the sensor, and removed during a recording. When the eyelid pressure was increased by pulling the lids tighter against the eye, the readings from the sensor significantly increased.

Published in:

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering  (Volume:56 ,  Issue: 10 )