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Evaluation of single- and multilayered amorphous tantalum nitride thin films as diffusion barriers in copper metallization

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4 Author(s)
Chen, G.S. ; Department of Materials Science, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407 Taiwan, Republic of China ; Chen, S.T. ; Yang, L.-C. ; Lee, P.Y.

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1116/1.582166 

This study evaluates 40-nm-thick amorphous Ta2N (a-Ta2N) thin films with various compositions and metallurgical designs as diffusion barriers for copper metallization. Results based on sheet resistance measurements, x-ray diffraction analyses, and transmission and scanning electron microscopies consistently follow a sequence of coarsening copper grains, transforming a-Ta2N into a crystalline phase, and finally forming {111}-faceted pyramid Cu3Si precipitates and TaSi2. The degradation of the single-layered stoichiometric Ta2N (a-Ta67N33) barriers is primarily triggered by a premature crystallization of the amorphous barrier layers at temperatures as low as 450 °C. However, as adequately designed double-layered (20 nm Ta67N33/20 nm Ta62N38) amorphous barriers can be subjected to high-temperature annealing without crystallization, the effectiveness of the double-layered barriers can be significantly improved, elevating the degradation temperature by approximately 100 °C. © 2000 American Vacuum Society.

Published in:

Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films  (Volume:18 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

Mar 2000

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