Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Reduction of false positives in lung nodule detection using a two-level neural classification

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

5 Author(s)
Jyh-Shyan Lin ; Radiol. Dept., Georgetown Univ. Med. Center, Washington, DC, USA ; Lo, S.-C.B. ; Hasegawa, A. ; Freedman, M.T.
more authors

The authors have developed a neural-digital computer-aided diagnosis system, based on a parameterized two-level convolution neural network (CNN) architecture and on a special multilabel output encoding procedure. The developed architecture was trained, tested, and evaluated specifically on the problem of diagnosis of lung cancer nodules found on digitized chest radiographs. The system performs automatic “suspect” localization, feature extraction, and diagnosis of a particular pattern-class aimed at a high degree of “true-positive fraction” detection and low “false-positive fraction” detection. In this paper, the authors aim at the presentation of the two-level neural classification method in reducing false-positives in their system. They employed receiver operating characteristics (ROC) method with the area under the ROC curve (Az) as the performance index to evaluate all the simulation results. The two-level CNN showed superior performance (Az=0.93) to the single-level CNN (Az=0.85). The proposed two-level CNN architecture is proven to be promising and to be extensible, problem-independent, and therefore, applicable to other medical or difficult diagnostic tasks in two-dimensional (2-D) image environments

Published in:

Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:15 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

Apr 1996

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.