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Mechanism and control of a spiral type of microrobot in pipe

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3 Author(s)
Qinxue Pan ; Dept. of Intell. Mech. Syst. Eng''g, Kagawa Univ., Takamatsu ; Shuxiang Guo ; Desheng Li

In this paper, we proposed two types of spiral microrobot that can move in human organs such like intestines, even blood vessels as an assumption has a great potential application for microsurgery. We begin with a mechanical study of the fish-like microrobot made by magnetic actuator. And then, based on the previous researches, the structures of the developed microrobot have been designed. By applying the alternate magnetic field, the developed microrobots can be manipulated with rotation movement in a pipe. And also, the motion mechanism, and characteristic evaluation of the microrobot have been discussed, and the speed of rotation movement can be controlled via frequency of the input current. The characteristic of the microrobot has been evaluated in this research. We aim that the microrobot has a rapid response, and it can clear out dirt which is adhering to the inner wall of pipe. This microrobot will play an important role in both industrial and medical applications such as microsurgery.

Published in:

Robotics and Biomimetics, 2008. ROBIO 2008. IEEE International Conference on

Date of Conference:

22-25 Feb. 2009

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