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Propagation of femtosecond optical pulses through uncoated and metal-coated near-field fiber probes

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2 Author(s)
Muller, R. ; Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Max-Born-Str. 2A, D-12489 Berlin, Germany ; Lienau, Christoph

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The spatiotemporal evolution of a 10-femtosecond light pulse (λ=805 nm) propagating through uncoated and metal-coated near-field fiber probes is analyzed theoretically within a two-dimensional model for s and p polarization of the incident field. Internal reflection inside uncoated fiber probes (cone angle of 28°) results in an efficient guiding towards the fiber tip and a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of about 260 nm≈λ/3 in case of s polarization. While the transmission through uncoated fiber probes has negligible effects on the temporal and spectral pulse profile, strong modifications are observed for metal-coated aperture probes. The wavelength-dependent aperture transmission gives rise to a pronounced blueshift and spectral narrowing of the transmitted pulses. © 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Published in:

Applied Physics Letters  (Volume:76 ,  Issue: 23 )

Date of Publication:

Jun 2000

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