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CuGaSe2 solar cell cross section studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum

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5 Author(s)
Glatzel, Th. ; Department of Solar Energy, Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin, Germany ; Marron, D.Fuertes ; Schedel-Niedrig, Th. ; Sadewasser, S.
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Kelvin probe force microscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions has been used to image the electronic structure of a Mo/CuGaSe2/CdS/ZnO thin film solar cell. Due to the high energy sensitivity together with a lateral resolution in the nanometer range we obtained detailed information about the various interfaces within the heterostructure. The absolute work function of the different materials was measured on a polished cross section. To obtain a flat and clean surface we optimized the sputtering process with Ar ions. The presence of an additional MoSe2 layer between the Mo backcontact and the CuGaSe2 absorber layer was observed. © 2002 American Institute of Physics.

Published in:

Applied Physics Letters  (Volume:81 ,  Issue: 11 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 2002

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