By Topic

Structure, properties, and thermal stability of in situ phosphorus‐doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon prepared by plasma‐enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $31
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

5 Author(s)
Jeng, S.J. ; IBM, Semiconductor Development Laboratory, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 ; Kotecki, D.E. ; Kanicki, J. ; Parks, C.C.
more authors

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1063/1.105148 

The correlations between structural, chemical, electrical, optical properties of in situ phosphorus‐doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon prepared by plasma‐enhanced chemical vapor deposition have been studied by high‐resolution transmission electron microscopy, secondary‐ion mass spectrometry, electrical conductivity, and optical measurements. Microcrystallinity has been observed at a substrate temperature as low as 100 °C with a 1% dilution of (1% PH3/SiH4) in H2. In situ phosphorous‐doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon is best grown at 200–300 °C in terms of microstructure, H and P content, and dopant activation. The effects of thermal processing and the use of silicon nitride cap deposited prior to anneal on the structure and properties of phosphorous‐doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon are also reported. The use of a silicon nitride capping layer is shown to inhibit recrystallization of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon during rapid thermal anneal.

Published in:

Applied Physics Letters  (Volume:58 ,  Issue: 15 )