Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Hydrogen shuttling near Hf-defect complexes in Si/SiO2/HfO2 structures

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $31
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

6 Author(s)
Marinopoulos, A.G. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA ; Batyrev, I. ; Zhou, X.J. ; Schrimpf, R.D.
more authors

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1063/1.2820380 

We propose that a defect complex comprising a suboxide Hf–Si bond and an interfacial dangling bond is responsible for the stress-induced buildup of interface traps in Si/SiO2/HfO2 capacitors. With the aid of first-principles calculations, we show that these defects possess a symmetric double-well energy minimum with a moderate intervening barrier. The calculated activation energies suggest a relatively easy hopping of H atoms between the two energy minima (a field-aided shuttling mechanism). This mechanism can explain the experimentally measured oscillations of interface-trap densities during switched-bias conditions following x-ray irradiation or constant-voltage stress.

Published in:

Applied Physics Letters  (Volume:91 ,  Issue: 23 )

Date of Publication:

Dec 2007

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.