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Organic solar cells with carbon nanotubes replacing In2O3:Sn as the transparent electrode

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9 Author(s)
van de Lagemaat, Jao ; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 ; Barnes, T.M. ; Rumbles, G. ; Shaheen, Sean E.
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Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1063/1.2210081 

We report two viable organic excitonic solar cell structures where the conventional In2O3:Sn (ITO) hole-collecting electrode was replaced by a thin single-walled carbon nanotube layer. The first structure includes poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and gave a nonoptimized device efficiency of 1.5%. The second did not use PEDOT as a hole selective contact and had an efficiency of 0.47%. The strong rectifying behavior of the device shows that nanotubes are selective for holes and are not efficient recombination sites. The reported excitonic solar cell, produced without ITO and PEDOT, is an important step towards a fully printable solar cell.

Published in:

Applied Physics Letters  (Volume:88 ,  Issue: 23 )

Date of Publication:

Jun 2006

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