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Implantable Myoelectric Sensors (IMESs) for Intramuscular Electromyogram Recording

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6 Author(s)
Weir, R.F. ; Biomechatronics Dev. Lab., Rehabilitation Inst. of Chicago, Chicago, IL ; Troyk, Phil R. ; DeMichele, G.A. ; Kerns, D.A.
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We have developed a multichannel electrogmyography sensor system capable of receiving and processing signals from up to 32 implanted myoelectric sensors (IMES). The appeal of implanted sensors for myoelectric control is that electromyography (EMG) signals can be measured at their source providing relatively cross-talk-free signals that can be treated as independent control sites. An external telemetry controller receives telemetry sent over a transcutaneous magnetic link by the implanted electrodes. The same link provides power and commands to the implanted electrodes. Wireless telemetry of EMG signals from sensors implanted in the residual musculature eliminates the problems associated with percutaneous wires, such as infection, breakage, and marsupialization. Each implantable sensor consists of a custom-designed application-specified integrated circuit that is packaged into a biocompatible RF BION capsule from the Alfred E. Mann Foundation. Implants are designed for permanent long-term implantation with no servicing requirements. We have a fully operational system. The system has been tested in animals. Implants have been chronically implanted in the legs of three cats and are still completely operational four months after implantation.

Published in:

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:56 ,  Issue: 1 )

Date of Publication:

Jan. 2009

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