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Integrating a Nanologic Knowledge Module Into an Undergraduate Logic Design Course

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2 Author(s)
Srivastava, S. ; Dept. of Electr. Eng., Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL ; Bhanja, S.

This work discusses a knowledge module in an undergraduate logic design course for electrical engineering (EE) and computer science (CS) students, that introduces them to nanocomputing concepts. This knowledge module has a twofold objective. First, the module interests students in the fundamental logical behavior and functionality of the nanodevices of the future, which will motivate them to enroll in other elective courses related to nanotechnology, offered in most EE and CS departments. Second, this module can be used to let students analyze, synthesize, and apply their existing knowledge of the Karnaugh-map-based Boolean logic reduction scheme into a revolutionary design context with majority logic. Where many efforts focus on developing new courses on nanofabrication and even nanocomputing, this work is designed to augment the existing standard EE and CS courses by inserting knowledge modules on nanologic structures so as to stimulate student interest without creating a significant diversion from the course framework.

Published in:

Education, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:51 ,  Issue: 3 )

Date of Publication:

Aug. 2008

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