Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, single article purchases and IEEE account management will be unavailable from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM ET (12:00 - 21:00 UTC). We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

QRS Slopes for Detection and Characterization of Myocardial Ischemia

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

3 Author(s)
Pueyo, E. ; Aragon Inst. for Eng. Res., Zaragoza ; Sornmo, L. ; Laguna, P.

In this study, the upward (IUS) and downward (IDS) slopes of the QRS complex are proposed as indices for quantifying ischemia-induced electrocardiogram (ECG) changes. Using ECG recordings acquired before and during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), it is found that the QRS slopes are considerably less steep during artery occlusion, in particular for IDS. With respect to ischemia detection, the slope indices outperform the often used high-frequency index (defined as the root mean square (rms) of the bandpass-filtered QRS signal for the frequency band 150-250 Hz) as the mean relative factors of change are much larger for IUS and IDS than for the high-frequency index (6.9 and 7.3 versus 3.7). The superior performance of the slope indices is equally valid when other frequency bands of the high-frequency index are investigated (the optimum one is found to be 125-175 Hz). Employing a simulation model in which the slopes of a template QRS are altered by different techniques, it is found that the slope changes observed during PTCA are mostly due to a widening of the QRS complex or a decrease of its amplitudes, but not a reduction of its high-frequency content or a combination of this and the previous effects. It is concluded that QRS slope information can be used as an adjunct to the conventional ST segment analysis in the monitoring of myocardial ischemia.

Published in:

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:55 ,  Issue: 2 )