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Brain–Computer Communication: Motivation, Aim, and Impact of Exploring a Virtual Apartment

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6 Author(s)
Leeb, R. ; Graz Univ. of Technol., Graz ; Lee, F. ; Keinrath, C. ; Scherer, R.
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The step away from a synchronized or cue-based brain-computer interface (BCI) and from laboratory conditions towards real world applications is very important and crucial in BCI research. This work shows that ten naive subjects can be trained in a synchronous paradigm within three sessions to navigate freely through a virtual apartment, whereby at every junction the subjects could decide by their own, how they wanted to explore the virtual environment (VE). This virtual apartment was designed similar to a real world application, with a goal-oriented task, a high mental workload, and a variable decision period for the subject. All subjects were able to perform long and stable motor imagery over a minimum time of 2 s. Using only three electroencephalogram (EEG) channels to analyze these imaginations, we were able to convert them into navigation commands. Additionally, it could be demonstrated that motivation is a very crucial factor in BCI research; motivated subjects perform much better than unmotivated ones.

Published in:

Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:15 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

Dec. 2007

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