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Multiview Video Coding Using View Interpolation and Color Correction

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9 Author(s)
Yamamoto, K. ; Universal Media Res. Center, Tokyo ; Kitahara, M. ; Kimata, H. ; Yendo, T.
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Neighboring views must be highly correlated in multiview video systems. We should therefore use various neighboring views to efficiently compress videos. There are many approaches to doing this. However, most of these treat pictures of other views in the same way as they treat pictures of the current view, i.e., pictures of other views are used as reference pictures (inter-view prediction). We introduce two approaches to improving compression efficiency in this paper. The first is by synthesizing pictures at a given time and a given position by using view interpolation and using them as reference pictures (view-interpolation prediction). In other words, we tried to compensate for geometry to obtain precise predictions. The second approach is to correct the luminance and chrominance of other views by using lookup tables to compensate for photoelectric variations in individual cameras. We implemented these ideas in H.264/AVC with inter-view prediction and confirmed that they worked well. The experimental results revealed that these ideas can reduce the number of generated bits by approximately 15% without loss of PSNR.

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Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:17 ,  Issue: 11 )