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What is the Added Value of Biomedical Engineering Technologies?

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1 Author(s)
Healy, Jean-Claude ; United Nations, New York

All the Nations are convinced the Research and Development (RD) in general and in the Biomedical Engineering (BME) area in particular, will save the present growing problems of the planet and accordingly, try to convince the tax payers to invest money and human resources for a better future quality of life. Of course this assumption is valid but, learnt from the last 3 century history of BME, must be documented. The first naive approach is to be convinced a magic unknown new technology will solve tomorrow the present global health and medical problems. The second approach highlights the economical impact including employment in the relevant industry. Many others approaches focuses on the progress of knowledge and sciences, on the global competition and others competitive advantages. But two main lessons are learnt from the past: 1) the impact of technologies are peanuts without an ad hoc implementation systems, and 2) the present "patient and disease centered Healthcare delivery systems" are the common paradigms for reasoning and are based on the assumption "sciences will save me".

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007. EMBS 2007. 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE

Date of Conference:

22-26 Aug. 2007