Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Validity of the CCIR amplitude scintillation model for satellite uplink and downlink communication links with reference to small terminal operation at EHF

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Haddon, John ; Matra Marconi Space UK Ltd., Abbey Works, Titchfield, Fareham, Hants, England.

Amplitude scintillation's on satellite communication downlinks are well characterized by the CCIR scintilation model which is now defined in the recommendations of the ITU-R PN.618-3. However amplitude scintillations also occur on uplink paths, for which an established analytical model appears not to exist. This paper applies weak scattering theory to up and downlink scattering geometry's and includes the effects of transmit and receive antenna apertures. Relationships are derived relating the observed uplink scintillation characteristics to those predicted by the CCIR downlink model. Theory predicts that uplink scintillations could be more severe than those on a downlink at the same frequency. These results are particularly relevant at EHF where amplitude scintillations on slant paths can be several dB's peak, yet rain fade margins must be constrained to 10 to 15 dB in order for the communication system to be economically practical.

Published in:

Microwave Conference, 1996. 26th European  (Volume:1 )

Date of Conference:

6-13 Sept. 1996

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.