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Electrical Contact Resistance Theory for Anisotropic Conductive Films Considering Electron Tunneling and Particle Flattening

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2 Author(s)
Jackson, R.L. ; Dept. of Mech. Eng., Auburn Univ., AL ; Kogut, L.

This study models the electrical contact resistance (ECR) between two surfaces separated by an anisotropic conductive film. The film is made up of an epoxy with conductive spherical particles(metallic) dispersed within. In practical situations the particles are often heavily loaded and will undergo severe plastic deformation and may essentially be flattened out. In between the particles and the surfaces there may also be an ultra-thin insulating film (consisting of epoxy) which causes considerable electrical resistance between the surfaces. In the past this effect has been neglected and the predicted ECR was much lower than that measured experimentally. This added resistance is considered using electron tunneling theory. The severe plastic deformation of the spherical particles is modeled using a new expanded elasto-plastic spherical contact model. This work also investigates the effect of compression of the separating epoxy film on the electrical contact resistance. The model finds that the high experimental ECR measurements can be accounted for by including the existence of a thin insulating film through the electron tunneling model

Published in:

Components and Packaging Technologies, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:30 ,  Issue: 1 )

Date of Publication:

March 2007

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