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Correcting Base-Assignment Errors in Repeat Regions of Shotgun Assembly

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5 Author(s)
Degui Zhi ; Bioinf. Program, California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA ; Keich, U. ; Pevzner, P. ; Heber, S.
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Accurate base-assignment in repeat regions of a whole genome shotgun assembly is an unsolved problem. Since reads in repeat regions cannot be easily attributed to a unique location in the genome, current assemblers may place these reads arbitrarily. As a result, the base-assignment error rate in repeats is likely to be much higher than that in the rest of the genome. We developed an iterative algorithm, EULER-AIR, that is able to correct base-assignment errors in finished genome sequences in public databases. The Wolbachia genome is among the best finished genomes. Using this genome project as an example, we demonstrated that EULER-AIR can 1) discover and correct base-assignment errors, 2) provide accurate read assignments, 3) utilize finishing reads for accurate base-assignment, and 4) provide guidance for designing finishing experiments. In the genome of Wolbachia, EULER-AIR found 16 positions with ambiguous base-assignment and two positions with erroneous bases. Besides Wolbachia, many other genome sequencing projects have significantly fewer finishing reads and, hence, are likely to contain more base-assignment errors in repeats. We demonstrate that EULER-AIR is a software tool that can be used to find and correct base-assignment errors in a genome assembly project

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Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on  (Volume:4 ,  Issue: 1 )