Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Taser Dart-to-Heart Distance That Causes Ventricular Fibrillation in Pigs

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

7 Author(s)
Jiun-Yan Wu ; Dept. of Electr. & Comput. Eng., Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI ; Hongyu Sun ; O'Rourke, A.P. ; Huebner, S.
more authors

Electromuscular incapacitating devices (EMDs), such as Tasers, deliver high current, short duration pulses that cause muscular contractions and temporarily incapacitate the human subject. Some reports suggest that EMDs can kill. To help answer the question, "Can the EMD directly cause ventricular fibrillation (VF)?," ten tests were conducted to measure the dart-to-heart distance that causes VF in anesthetized pigs [mass=64 kgplusmn6.67 standard deviation (SD)] for the most common X26 Taser. The dart-to-heart distance that caused VF was 17 mmplusmn6.48 (SD) for the first VF event and 13.7 mmplusmn6.79 (SD) for the average of the successive VF events. The result shows that when the stimulation dart is close enough to the heart, X26 Taser current will directly trigger VF in pigs. Echocardiography of erect humans shows skin-to-heart distances from 10 to 57 mm (dart-to-heart distances of 1-48 mm). These results suggest that the probability of a dart on the body landing in 1 cm2 over the ventricle and causing VF is 0.000172

Published in:

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:54 ,  Issue: 3 )

Date of Publication:

March 2007

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.