Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Incoherent Scattering of Radio Waves by Free Electrons with Applications to Space Exploration by Radar

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Gordon, W.E. ; School of Elec. Eng., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y.

Free electrons in an ionized medium scatter radio waves weakly. Under certain conditions only incoherent scattering exists. A powerful radar can detect the incoherent backscatter from the free electrons in and above the earth's ionosphere. The received signal is spread in frequency by the Doppler shifts associated with the thermal motion of the electrons. On the basis of incoherent backscatter by free electrons a powerful radar, but one whose components are presently within the state of the art, is capable of: 1) measuring electron density and electron temperature as a function of height and time at all levels in the earth's ionosphere and to heights of one or more earth's radii; 2) measuring auroral ionization; 3) detecting transient streams of charged particles coming from outer space; and 4) exploring the existence of a ring current. The instrument is capable of 1) obtaining radar echoes from the sun, Venus, and Mars and possibly from Jupiter and Mercury; and 2) receiving from certain parts of remote space hitherto-undetected sources of radiation at meter wavelengths.

Published in:

Proceedings of the IRE  (Volume:46 ,  Issue: 11 )

Date of Publication:

Nov. 1958

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.