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Optical orthogonal codes with unequal auto- and cross-correlation constraints

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2 Author(s)
Guu-Chang Yang ; Dept. of Electr. Eng., Nat. Chung-Hsing Univ., Taichung, Taiwan ; Fuja, T.E.

An optical orthogonal code (OOC) is a collection of binary sequences with good auto- and cross-correlation properties; they were defined by Salehi and others as a means of obtaining code-division multiple access on optical networks. Up to now, all work on OOCs have assumed that the constraint placed on the autocorrelation and that placed on the cross-correlation are the same. We consider-codes for which the two constraints are not equal. Specifically we develop bounds on the size of such OOCs and demonstrate constriction techniques for building them. The results demonstrate that a significant increase in the code size is possible by letting the autocorrelation constraint exceed the cross-correlation constraint. These results suggest that for a given performance requirement the optimal OOC may be one with unequal constraints. This paper also views OOCs with unequal auto- and cross-correlation constraints as constant-weight unequal error protection (UEP) codes with two levels of protection. The bounds derived are interpreted from this viewpoint.

Published in:

Information Theory, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:41 ,  Issue: 1 )

Date of Publication:

Jan. 1995

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