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Efficient EREW PRAM algorithms for parentheses-matching

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3 Author(s)
Prasad, S.K. ; Dept. of Math. & Comput. Sci., Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA, USA ; Das, S.K. ; Chen, C.C.-Y.

We present four polylog-time parallel algorithms for matching parentheses on an exclusive-read and exclusive-write (EREW) parallel random-access machine (PRAM) model. These algorithms provide new insights into the parentheses-matching problem. The first algorithm has a time complexity of O(log2 n) employing O(n/(log n)) processors for an input string containing n parentheses. Although this algorithm is not cost-optimal, it is extremely simple to implement. The remaining three algorithms, which are based on a different approach, achieve O(log n) time complexity in each case, and represent successive improvements. The second algorithm requires O(n) processors and working space, and it is comparable to the first algorithm in its ease of implementation. The third algorithm uses O(n/(log n)) processors and O(n log n) space. Thus, it is cost-optimal, but uses extra space compared to the standard stack-based sequential algorithm. The last algorithm reduces the space complexity to O(n) while maintaining the same processor and time complexities. Compared to other existing time-optimal algorithms for the parentheses-matching problem that either employ extensive pipelining or use linked lists and comparable data structures, and employ sorting or a linked list ranking algorithm as subroutines, the last two algorithms have two distinct advantages. First, these algorithms employ arrays as their basic data structures, and second, they do not use any pipelining, sorting, or linked list ranking algorithms

Published in:

Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:5 ,  Issue: 9 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 1994

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