Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

How could object-oriented concepts and parallelism cohabit?

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

6 Author(s)

A lot of new languages and new concepts have been conceived in order to promote parallelism in the object-oriented framework. These proposals could be investigated using different concepts related to parallelism and object orientation. Among these concepts, we can find shared variables/message passing, inheritance/delegation, reflection. The degrees of a good cohabitation may be appreciated by combining the above concepts. In order to have significant criteria we have to determine how languages fit some requirements. These requirements should cover the different phases of programs development i.e. specification, design and implementation. To structure the discussion, we may focus on some formalisms and languages, in order to specify and to implement concurrent objects. The benefits of the different classes of these formalisms and languages should be discussed from a methodological point of view. The issues to be addressed in this context could include the following questions: what are the main characteristic design principles and methodologies of concurrent object-oriented programming? How could the current object-oriented methodologies handle concurrent and distributed objects?

Published in:

Computer Languages, 1994., Proceedings of the 1994 International Conference on

Date of Conference:

16-19 May 1994

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.